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ENGLISH FOR ACADEMIC & PROFESSIONAL PURPOSES

Guidelines for Writing a Scientific Report

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  • Write your abstract only after you’ve finished writing the whole report. Doing so would allow you to have a holistic view of your research so you can focus on its important aspects, especially the results and conclusion.
  • Remember that each part of your report is a self-contained unit. so try not to repeat the information you have stated in a previous section. However, making comparisons between the objectives found in the introduction and the results found in the conclusion would be reasonable.
  • Because of its technical nature, the scientific report should be written in a strictly formal way, using the past tense and the passive voice.
  • Label your pictures, graphs or tables aids properly and explain each concisely. 
  • Although the aim of your report is to explain a scientific concept, be able to reach as many readers as possible. If you must use scientific jargon, remember that not all readers are familiar with it. For instance, if you are explaining the concept of hydrosulfurization, be able to simplify it for your non-science oriented readers.

Note!

Consider carefully when and how to use scientific jargon and make sure to clarify their meanings to increase
your paper's readability.

  • Because of its technical nature, the scientific report should be written in a strictly formal way, using the past tense and the passive voice.
  • Label your pictures, graphs or tables aids properly and explain each concisely. 
  • Although the aim of your report is to explain a scientific concept, be able to reach as many readers as possible. If you must use scientific jargon, remember that not all readers are familiar with it. For instance, if you are explaining the concept of hydrosulfurization, be able to simplify it for your non-science oriented readers.
  • Be objective when you write your report. Avoid subjective statements when you are describing a scientific phenomenon and do not allow your emotions to influence your conclusion. Take note of the following examples:

Biased: The respondent is obviously not healthy.
More objective: The respondent has a 4012c temperature, with rashes all over her face.

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